Jon Peddie Blogs

20 Pounds of AR

Posted by Jon Peddie on January 21st 2014 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, VIZ-SIM
Tags: iphone pixels ar

”Good morning sir, and welcome to Waltmar,” the smiling older gentleman with wavy silver hair said, his false teeth shining in the sunlight, ” how can we help you today? We’re having a sale on 720p pixels, and there’s still some DVDs left if you hurry.”   “Thanks,” Ranger said, “but I’m looking for some AR, I’d like to buy 10 or 20 pounds of it, or however you sell it.” “Yes sir, that’d be in aisle 10, near the end, just past the invisible wearables-and boy are they selling like hot cakes.” Ranger ambled down the rows and walked down…

There’s going to over 2 million happy kids this holiday

Posted by Jon Peddie on November 26th 2013 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, Games
Tags:

Microsoft and Sony set new sales records Was there a pent up demand for a new gen console? Duh, you think so? Prior to the announcement that MS and Sony were going to do a gen 8 console, shortly after Nintendo announced the Wii U, console sale dipped even further. Who would buy an old box when a new one was coming? And then in the last seven days or so, over two million of them went flying off the shelves—Sony sold over a million units in just 24 hours and a few days later Microsoft repeated the accomplishment; that’s about…

Is It Up or Down? Depends on How & What You Count

Posted by Jon Peddie on October 14th 2013 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, General Interest
Tags: jon peddie pc idc gartner pc shipments pc industry

Gartner and IDC last week (Oct. 9) released their measurements of the PC industry. The dueling giant research firms have never agreed on the exact number. If they did, one of them would become instantly redundant, but they are close enough. IDC's count at 81.61 million is 1.7 percent higher than Gartner's 80.28 million units worldwide. However, each firm took a slightly different slant on its counts. Gartner said, "Worldwide PC shipments totaled 80.3 million units in the third quarter of 2013, an 8.6 percent decline from the same period last year... This marks the sixth consecutive quarter of declining worldwide…

Trends and Forecasts in Computer Graphics— power-efficient rendering

Posted by Jon Peddie on October 1st 2013 | Permalink
Categories: General Interest
Tags: apple qualcomm opengl es pixar tiling computer graphics imagination technologies power management opensubdivision deferred rendering

This is the second in a series of observations about computer graphics (CG) trends, opportunities, and challenges.  (the first installment can be found at http://jonpeddie.com/blogs/comments/trends-and-forecasts-in-computer-graphics/ )   Introduction Today’s mobile processors are improving at an astonishing rate – and consequently delivering visually stunning user experiences in less than 3 Watts of power consumption. Just how is it that mobile processors running at 5% of the power of a game console, can produce the kind of graphics realism we had previously come to expect only from game consoles. It’s all about the pixel and making it shine, without drinking a lot of…

Seeing more

Posted by Jon Peddie on August 6th 2013 | Permalink
Categories: Mobile
Tags: mobile tablets pixels ppi screen

Tablets have screen sizes from 7-inches to 20-inches and sell for $70 to over $1,200. They have PPI ranging from 132 to 339. Factoring that data for some of the more popular devices we produced the following chart of the cost per megapixel.   Ironically, the lowest cost tablet, the 7-inch Ematic ($75) got the best score. The chart proves a single factor, like PPI, doesn’t tell the whole story. This chart and lots of other data will be in our forthcoming 2013 report, Mobile Devices and the GPUs in them. Pre orders are being accepted now. Contact Robert Dow Robert@jonpeddie.com…

Trends and Forecasts in Computer Graphics

Posted by Jon Peddie on June 19th 2013 | Permalink
Categories: General Interest, New product showcase
Tags: apple mobile khronos trends api forecast

A new semi-regular series Having just finished a book on the history of computer graphics I’ve decided to be Janus and also look at the future, which seems appropriate because that’s where we’re all going to end up. Over the next few months I’m going to post essays and thoughts on what I see as the developing trends, and some far out ideas (like a totally voxel-based game and rendering engine). I’d also like to hear from you. What do you think is an interesting, or scary trend, and what would you like to see? Of course, I don’t have to…

Nvidia’s “Core” business

Posted by Jon Peddie on June 19th 2013 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, Engineering and Development
Tags: nvidia tegra kepler ip titan

Nvidia introduces a new business unit targeted at the other billion opportunities Nvidia has been involved with embedded, semi-custom and IP sales for special customers like Sony, Microsoft, Intel and Audi for several years, so they are no stranger to the idea, or the issues in supporting such customers. In the last, five or so years we have seen the demand for visualization and embedded compute sky rocket. As one Nvidia exec said to me, “You can’t swing a dead cat and not hit a viz app or need”.  And he’s right. That’s the good news. The bad news, if it…

Microsoft unveils AMD-powered Xbox One

Posted by Jon Peddie on May 22nd 2013 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, Games
Tags: amd radeon apu x-box

I want one! Microsoft announced its new Xbox, the follow-on to its Xbox 360. This is the next-generation game console, like Sony’s new PS4, but Microsoft is positioning it as the center of the (your) home entertainment system. The Xbox One is as much about playing movies and music, watching TV, and video conferencing as it is about games, but locally and online. The Xbox One comes with a new controller design and a new Kinect. It also comes with some very impressive voice and gesture recognition capabilities. The demos showing the accuracy and speed of the features were impressive. To…

Qualcomm’s powerful new HPU the S4

Posted by Jon Peddie on October 7th 2011 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, Engineering and Development
Tags: gpu qualcomm snapdragon krait simd adreno hexagon dsp s4 processor

Initially leveraging a 28nm process from TSMC, Qualcomm has announced its Snapdragon S4 class of processors, of which the first member is the MSM8960 with an Adreno 225 GPU. The new 1.5 GHz processor (S4 will scale up to 2.5GHz) has Qualcomm’s micro-architectural design with four independent, proprietary ARM Cortex A15-class CPU cores, plus a 32-core GPU, plus 128 bit SIMD engine, plus three DSPs, plus a handful of hardwired engines for codecs and other special-purpose functions—basically a five processor+ heterogeneous processor that has an open programming environment, and a fast memory interface and manager. The new CPU core is compatible…

HP — breaking up the place

Posted by Jon Peddie on August 23rd 2011 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, The Market
Tags: hp, apotheker, psg, rick belluzzo, dell, hp, workstation,

HP’s Personal System group, PSG, is a $41 billion dollar company. It is, IMHO, a jewel, but I may be a bit biased because I have a lot of old friends there. And, like any large organization, it’s not just one thing. In macro scale it’s a desktop PC company, a notebook PC company, a workstation company, and maybe a mobile devices company. It also makes and sells monitors. In other words its five companies and anyone of them could be further subdivided.Now if HP really wants to get rid of this prize which still boggles my midget mind, would they…

AMD, ARM, and all that jazz — reading between the lines will make you cross-eyed

Posted by Jon Peddie on August 3rd 2011 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, Engineering and Development
Tags: amd, gpu, fusion, x86, fsail, arm,

There have been persistent rumors, opinions, and speculation since AMD’s Fusion Developer’s Summit (AFDS) that because ARM was one of the keynote speakers a grand collusion was in the works—the ARMing of AMD.The concept gets fuel from the abrupt discharge of Dirk Meyer, the company’s former president for allegedly not having a mobile strategy.AMD’s announcement of a Fusion System Architecture—Intermediate Layer, into an open platform was one of the main messages AMD wanted to get out at AFDS. They are calling it FSAIL. AMD has said they will publish the Fusion System Architecture (FSA) virtual Instruction Set Architecture (ISA) (FSAIL), FSA…

Tablets — the canary in the PC tunnel?

Posted by Jon Peddie on July 11th 2011 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, The Market
Tags: apple tablets economy

The second quarter by all accounts so far has not been a blockbuster, in fact in some places it’s been a career buster. The DJIA wobbled, not many new jobs were created, and the politics in the US got even more rancorous if such a thing is possible. In the PC industry the major bright spot had been tablets. Called computer tablets, media tablets, tablet PCs, or just tablets; reinvented by Apple and followed by a dozen or more imitators, tablets excited the industry — the latest great thing. No one needs a tablet. It doesn’t do anything that can’t be…

WebGL Security - Kill it before it grows?

Posted by Jon Peddie on June 29th 2011 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, Content Creation, Mobile
Tags: 3d opengl khronos microsoft webgl security shaders browsers context

When Khronos launched the WebGL specifications with strong backing from Mozilla, Google, Apple and Opera we thought at least peace had come to the 3D web valley. We should have known better; seems that there are competing vested interests in proprietary software and plug-ins that will put a few bumps in the road in WebGL's journey to pervasiveness. Last week we were told by Microsoft, the developers of Silverlight, that WebGL is a giant piss-hole into which any yahoo can pour viruses, spoofs, and even DoS attacks - ack! The sky is falling run run run. In a post by James…

Getting vertical – what Nvidia’s acquisition of Icera means

Posted by Jon Peddie on May 9th 2011 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, Engineering and Development
Tags: nvidia, gpu, icrea, 3g modem, 4g modem, tsmc, tegra

Nvidia announced the acquisition of UK-based maker of baseband chips for 3G and 4G handsets, Icrea for $367 million in cash. This is a really big deal – not for the purchase price but for the impact it’s going to have on the industry. Now the playing field in mobile devices is shaping up to a big three (or four) players, a normal consolidation in a broadly fragmented market. With Nvidia’s acquisition of Icera, Nvidia now has a total processor stack like Qualcomm, and Intel. Qualcomm and Nvidia are going to be head-to-head competitors. Icrea products already compete directly and quite…

What is a PC?

Posted by Jon Peddie on January 28th 2011 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, The Market
Tags:

The debate continues among suppliers, analysts, pundits, and web forum participants as to whether tablets (specifically the Apple iPad) should be counted as a PC or not. From our perspective the issue is defined (if it can be) by the processor. Fragmentation is finally affecting the PC market. Options such as tablets, E-books, consoles, and even talented phones are doing jobs PCs could do. Also, consoles and Kindles. These other devices are not replacing PCs, but they're shifting interest and mind share. They're enabling people to leave devices at home for vacation and short trips. No more lugging a computer to…

Calling all old pixel pushers

Posted by Jon Peddie on January 17th 2011 | Permalink
Categories: General Interest
Tags:

I'm proud to say that I have been elected president of the Siggraph Pioneers for 2011 and 2012.My first act in this role is to invite new members to the organization.If you've been involved with computer graphics for the past 20 years or more you're eligible, and you should join us. Why?Because you have valuable experience you could share with others, and in particular youngsters entering the field.Because you’ll get to see some old friends, and maybe share some old memories.Because you’ll be recognized for your contribution to the industry And last but not least because I invited you.Computer Graphics Pioneer…

Nvidia looks good

Posted by Jon Peddie on January 11th 2011 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, The Market
Tags: nvidia tegra tesla nvidia optimus nvidia tegra nvidia settlement nvidia vs. intel

Nvidia like many companies in the past two years has gone through some dramatic and bruising changes. How a company comes out of those events is the key to predicting their future.I’m not going to review the past, if you don’t know it, you probably aren't reading this.Here’s what I see on the horizon for Nvidia.Tegra, the company’s smallest product, smallest ASP, smallest results to date is probably going to show some life in 2011. The company is shipping Tegra 2 and will soon introduce Tegra 3 to OEMs – the rest of the world will not get much information on…

The tablet bubble – a billion dollar lemmings race

Posted by Jon Peddie on January 7th 2011 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, The Market
Tags:

Or ... a bunch of teenagers drinking and driving The impact and influence of Apple on the rest of the PC and mobile phone industry is astonishing. Many of the CES tablets this year represent the herd-like knee-jerk reactions to Apple’s product introductions by industry veterans. As a result of all the jerking knees, about 100 new tablets have been introduced. It started at CES last year, it accelerated at Computex in Taiwan last June and continues at CES this year. I estimate it costs about $1,000,000 to develop a tablet, and that’s probably conservative. That 1,000,000 figure assumes certain infrastructure,…

Intel, tick tocking away

Posted by Jon Peddie on January 1st 2011 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, The Market
Tags:

Intel had a solid year of shipping 32nm processors from their Westmere family and followed the company’s “tick-tock” strategy to spread the engineering risk out among generations. Intel has new competition on the low-end from ARM and ARM’s new best friend Microsoft and on the top from GPUs in supercomputers and server clusters. To offset some of that impact the company has moved into the low end low power SoC market and invested in software by buying Wind River and Mcafee. Here’s what I see for Intel in the near future.Processors and process. No company ships more processors than Intel –…

AMD Poised For Growth

Posted by Jon Peddie on January 1st 2011 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, The Market
Tags:

It’s been just over a year since Intel and AMD reached their landmark settlement, and two years since the company entered into a joint agreement with ATIC on the fab. Those were huge movements involving huge sums of money and they take a long time to be digested. AMD never stopped doing what it does, and neither has its graphics group, the former ATI, but with these two monumental changes, the management of AMD has been able to focus better, and get their house in order. You can see the results of that new focus and vitality in some of the…

Tough to beat free

Posted by Jon Peddie on December 24th 2010 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, The Market
Tags:

Microsoft started it a long long time ago, and now Microsoft may now be the biggest victim of it – giving stuff away. When Microsoft was striving for market share with its operating system, and later with its applications like Office, it established the policy of adding programs that were developed by third parties to augment either the OS or apps. Spell check is a good example. Small companies made accessory programs for Word that would do spell and grammar checking, and then Microsoft added it and made it free, built into the cost of Office. That was great for the…

Apple gains market share – really?

Posted by Jon Peddie on December 9th 2010 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, The Market
Tags:

I don’t think so. According to DisplaySearch (a division of NPD that  counts screens shipments), Apple captured a 12.4% share of global mobile PC shipments in Q3’10, benefiting from the iPad effect. In other words, because Apple shipped a lot of iPads the company’s market share in “mobile PCs” increased.OK, go Apple, but, the press release from DisplaySerach makes me wonder if we have to reassess our definition of what a “PC” is? Up until now I had a somewhat parochial opinion that a PC had to run Windows, Linux, or Mac OS X, i.e., “Snow Leopard.” (The iPad runs the…

Playing at War

Posted by Jon Peddie on November 28th 2010 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, Games
Tags:

I got Activision's "Call of Duty – Black Ops" (CODBO) and EA's "Medal of Honor" (MOH) a couple of weeks ago, but due to travel schedules didn’t get a chance to try them until late last week, so I’m behind every reviewer in the world, but I've got a few things to say. I play single person on a PC, on some pretty good, no excellent, equipment. Underutilized hardware I ran CODBO first and tried to get it to play in stereovision on my Nvidia 3D Surround Vision system with three 23-inch (1920 x 1080) monitors and dual GTX480 AIBs. This…

Market Expansion? ISV’s hold the reins

Posted by Jon Peddie on October 31st 2010 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, Engineering and Development
Tags: market software isv semiconductor

The major volume and/or super expensive software suppliers have had a free lunch for the past fifteen or more years. Basically making bug fixes and a few feature improvements they got performance boasts from CPU clock and pipeline improvements, plus I/O improvements, and dropping DRAM and disc drive costs with increased capacity – the ISVs have been the biggest benefactors of Moore’s law.Now they have to do something. Now they have to embrace Heterogeneous Processors (HPUs), GPU-compute, multi-threading, and parallel-processing.Having spent the last three decades trying to obtain silo dominance with proprietary and incomprehensible file formats, obnoxious, infuriating and incompatible (within…

Gaming PCs and consoles; those damn numbers

Posted by Jon Peddie on August 24th 2010 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, Games
Tags: pc gaming console gaming gaming machines game developers console shipments pcs vs. consoles

Someone said you can make statistics prove anything you want and that person is right. It all comes down to what you use for definitions of the item under scrutiny.  It also has to do with how you count things. The PC Gaming Alliance (PCGA) recently put out a press-release that stated, “Annual shipment volumes for the PC Gaming hardware market in 2009 were over two times larger than the combined Wii, PlayStation  2, PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 console units shipped in the same period. They then estimated the worldwide number of consumers gaming with discrete graphics solutions on their…

Quadrillions and Quadrillions of Cycles

Posted by Jon Peddie on July 24th 2010 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, Engineering and Development
Tags:

The number of processors, both x86 and GPU, available for rendering has been increasing exponentially. Rendering is one of the applications that can soak up all the cycles that are available to it, which is an example of Peddie’s first law – In computer graphics, too much is not enough. We looked at the installed base of x86 and GPU processors, applied a factor for the average number of cores and developed the following chart. Cores alone don’t tell the whole story, the real measure is how millions of operations per second can the processor execute. A general figure of merit…

The New Visualization

Posted by Jon Peddie on July 10th 2010 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, VIZ-SIM
Tags: nvidia amd ati radeon quadro eyefinity add-in-boards large scale visualization 3d surround evans & sutherland

In order to design automobiles, airplanes, search for oil (or contain it), and examine artifacts like a 2000-year-old mummy, large scale visualization systems are needed.Visualization system can mean different things to different people so a little definition is required to avoid confusion and controversy.I make a distinction between large-scale and localized visualization systems. A localized system, by my definition, is a single monitor used by an investigator and may be shown to colleagues, on occasion. Visualization systems employing voxels for medical research is a typical example, as are individual product lifecycle management (PLM) visualization systems. Visualization systems are also often confused…

Nintendo goes with DMP for S3D graphics engine

Posted by Jon Peddie on June 20th 2010 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, Engineering and Development
Tags:

Today, DMP announced in Japan that Nintendo has adopted DMP OpenGL ES 1.1 compliant PICA200 for the 3DS. The new Nintendo 3DS is an amazing little device. The DS has already been a beloved machine attracting over 100 million users since 2004. Not many products (that I can think of, at least) can match that volume of enthusiasm or the customer base. And it’s self perpetuating because the installed base attracts developers which create new games which attracts new consumers – it is a perfect ecosystem. Nintendo has experimented with S3D for years, starting with the Nintendo Virtual Boy monochrome system, and…

E3 Press event – press need not attend

Posted by Jon Peddie on June 16th 2010 | Permalink
Categories: General Interest, Show reports
Tags:

Against my better judgment I went to E3 two days early so I could attend the “press events” of the console companies. These events are often associated with some form (ahem) of entertainment. They are also oversubscribed, overcrowded, and usually uninformative. Why then are these megamillion dollar extravaganzas held? What’s the ROI for Microsoft, Nintendo, or Sony? Good question. It’s a matter of impressions PR people live for and get measured by the number of impressions they deliver for the dollar. An impression is measured by taking the readership of a magazine, website, radio show, etc, and dividing the costs of…

Playing with six monitors—is that a “full deck?”

Posted by Jon Peddie on March 8th 2010 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, Content Creation
Tags: amd ati mt. tiburon testing eyefinity multi-monitor

Here at Mt. Tiburon Testing Labs we're testing a lot of stuff as usual. However, the one system that will get a lot of attention from us and our readers is the six-headed ATI-based EyeFinity. The system consists of six 22-inch 1920 x 1080 displays - yes, that's 5760 x 2160 resolution in a 3 x 2 array 61 x 24 inches, backed up by a 2GB GDDR5 graphics board, running on a 3.7GHz 4GB RAM, SSD, Nehalem system, with of course, great sound. When the system is first brought to life it is six duplicate displays The next step is…

Jon’s tortuous path to the iPhone

Posted by Jon Peddie on February 11th 2010 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, General Interest
Tags:

I proudly consider myself a geek and an early adopter. When the slick N95 from Nokia first came out I knew I had to have one. The unit wasn't yet available in the United States, but that wasn't going to be a problem for me. My colleague and longtime friend's daughter in England works for Vodafone and Vodafone was the carrier that was offering the N95.I had long used two mobile phones, one for the US and one for rest of the world because the US had been so late to adopt the higher-speed digital systems like GSM and 3G. The…

Intel Will Never Buy Nvidia

Posted by Jon Peddie on December 9th 2009 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, Engineering and Development
Tags:

Someone just sent me an email and asked if I thought Intel might buy Nvidia now that Larrabee is dead. I would have just answered it and then disregarded it if I hadn't gotten a phone call asking the same dumb question. Intel won't buy Nvidia for the following reasons: Larrabee isn't dead - there will be a Larrabee graphics chip, based on x86 architecture. There will be a whole family of Larrabee chips. Wishful thinking won't make Intel or its ambitions go away. The company has, and continues to make, huge investments in the graphics technology and space. Intel believes…

Larrabee past, present, future

Posted by Jon Peddie on December 6th 2009 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, Engineering and Development
Tags: amd intel larrabee cpus gpus

"Larrabee silicon and software development are behind where we hoped to be at this point in the project," said Intel spokesperson Nick Knupffe. "As a result, our first Larrabee product will not be launched as a standalone discrete graphics product." (December 4, 2009.) After three years of bombast, Intel shocked the world by canceling Larrabee. Instead of launching the chip in the consumer market, Intel will make it available as a software development platform for both internal and external developers. Those developers can use it to develop software that can run in high-performance computers. The following is an excerpt from an…

Nvidia and Starting the Next Age of Super Computing

Posted by Jon Peddie on October 7th 2009 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, Engineering and Development
Tags: nvidia opencl directx cuda fermi compute

“I believe that we need something big and new every four years or so.” – Jen Hsun Huang Nvidia has been planning to be in the super computer business for the past three years. The company has had stellar growth since the internet melt down in 2001, and it has come to dominate almost every market it has entered, but Nvidia is now facing limited growth opportunities in its classical markets and new competition. Its main rival for graphics chips ATI has renewed itself with a winning and very challenging price/performance product design and positioning. Nvidia’s integrated chip business is declining…

Siggraph!

Posted by Jon Peddie on August 10th 2009 | Permalink
Categories: General Interest, Show reports
Tags: graphics siggraph jon peddie rendering

For a recession, in an off-the-beaten-track southern city, in the dead of summer, Siggraph had a robust turnout, My guess was that about 18k pixel-loving souls made the trek, but the actual count was a little over 11k. I saw a lot of old friends, some from Japan, some from Redmond,  some from Holland, France, and Finland – so the show was enough of a magnet for some people to make that kind of time and money investment in these challenging economic times. The emerging technologies had its usual array of wacky wonderful weird things; one of the most impressive was a huge feathery…

Chaos in stereovision land

Posted by Jon Peddie on May 28th 2009 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, The Market
Tags:

This is moment of great opportunity I’ve been attending and speaking at stereovision conferences for the past year or so. As a matter of fact, I just spent three days in Paris at the Dimension3 Conference and Expo where there was a lot of great information shared by people actually trying to make stereovision work. As it turns out I have a lot to say about the subject having worked in and with stereo for several decades. As I and others have reported there are conflicting proposed standards in the cinema, for the TV, the PC, and handheld devices. All four…

My life on free; why Gutenberg and a bunch of monks are rolling in their graves

Posted by Jon Peddie on May 24th 2009 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, The Market
Tags:

Let me tell what I did for a few hours today. I opened up a short story I wrote seven years ago. I used Open Office Writer, a free and very powerful, fully compatible, word-processor to do do my edits. Then I went to Wordpress and registered for a blog page. Then I installed in my free Firefox web browser (I have three actually, Firefox, Opera, and Safari) a tool for converting from “word” files to HTML for blog entries, called ScribeFire. I took my word-processor file, which I had saved in Word 2007 format and and dropped it in Scribefire.…

Rating of AIBs and motherboards and the new consumer

Posted by Jon Peddie on April 20th 2009 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, Benchmarking
Tags: nvidia amd aib motherboards benchmarking

We have all seen the excellent work various web site and analysts (including us) have done over the years in comparing the latest graphics AIBs, and more recently the new graphics enabled motherboards. Some have been more thorough than others, but all contain performance measurements from 3Dmark/Vantage and/or FPS in game play. And for the high-end game enthusiast where performance is everything, that’s enough. But is it enough for the rest of us? Now that the world is starting to come out of the financial shock of 2008 we (analyst types) can see that there will be a new consumer for…

Ion arrives

Posted by Jon Peddie on April 7th 2009 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, The Market
Tags: nvidia acer notebooks lowcost pc

We have just learned that the illegitimate, and subsequently abandoned child of Creüsa, daughter of Erechtheus and wife of Xuthus, Ion, has been seen in Taiwan hiding in a slick looking blue box that… What?  Oh. Never mind, wrong Ion. Let’s start over.   The dark chocolate found in stores all over Greece is being melted into a new blue box from…  OK, I got this time – don’t interrupt me again. Acer is going to build a really slick little blue box with a positively or negatively charged atom in it, and a regular Atom, which Acer will call AspireRevo.…

The hammer falls – Intel hits AMD and Nvidia – who’s next?

Posted by Jon Peddie on March 18th 2009 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, The Market
Tags:

Intel hits AMD and Nvidia 64-bit x86 could be withdrawn -  this is MAD. Remember all those clever comments about how Intel is a hammer so everything looks like a nail to them? Well the hammer is smacking its competitors. First up was VIA who just threw in the towel and gave up on the chipset business. Next was Nvidia who were told they couldn't interface to QPI – which would shut them out of the chipset biz. Today's nail was AMD and they were told they've got 60 days to get out of Dodge and to stop building x86 parts.…

I love Stereovision – I hate stereovision

Posted by Jon Peddie on February 4th 2009 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, Games
Tags:

I'm all for anything that will make gaming more fun. For the past ten years that has been primarily more better’er GPUs and APIs to be able to get at them. Great sound with true 5.1 positioning came online and added life to games around five years ago. About four years ago we began playing with better physics, and somewhere in the shadows of the PC gaming industry AI work was advancing too, but not as widely discussed. A sub set of the AI and physics was rag-doll and Natural Motion so the AI would behave more, ah, naturally. So what’s…

The Blu ray factor: If Microsoft come out with a BD accessory, where’s Sony’s advantage?

Posted by Jon Peddie on January 8th 2009 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, IDTV
Tags:

First off let me make it clear I am not a Sony basher, I like Sony, and I love the PS3. I also like Microsoft and the Xbox360. Sony has said they won’t drop the price of the PS3, and has even stopped building the lower cost smaller disk version. Why, in a world of economic turmoil would Sony seem to be swimming against the tide? For one thing Sony believes, and I agree, that the PS3 represents value for money. One of the main values of the PS3 is the Blu-ray (BD) player in it. The PS3 is a fully…

Intel’ s Core i7 is FAST but getting there isn’t

Posted by Jon Peddie on November 19th 2008 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, Engineering and Development
Tags:

I was invited to the Intel Core i7 victory lap party in way, way downtown south of the biotech area that’s exploding in San Francisco known as the dogpatch, is an area filled with old warehouses now used by film and art studios, and a few software development firms. On my way to the Intel i7 rollout I was making a left to the designated parking area – parking being the most unavailable thing in this area of empty lots – go figure, and when I got to the right lane of on-coming traffic (the left two lanes were stopped waiting…

New Laptops defy dim market expectations

Posted by Jon Peddie on November 17th 2008 | Permalink
Categories: General Interest, New product showcase
Tags:

Figure 1: Market share of laptop and desktop PCs. (Source: Jon Peddie Research) Figure 2: Market share of laptop and desktop GPUs. (Source; Jon Peddie Research) Figure 3: Market share of laptop GPUs (IGP and Discrete). (Source: Jon Peddie Research) There were some interesting announcements last week in Laptop Land as the manufacturers geared up for the impending holiday madness, although it does appear that the global recession worries, and general lack of consumer confidence may dampen some of the dreams of the suppliers. Typically, in times of economic depression non-essential purchases are postponed, or at best case, the consumer looks…

Nvidia laid off?

Posted by Jon Peddie on October 25th 2008 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, The Market
Tags:

Having been in this industry almost as long as Gordon Moore and Jerry Sanders I have gotten to know a lot of people in it. And having known Nvidia since before it was Nvidia, I have gotten to know every single employee in the company and all who once worked for the company.  In fact, other than Jen Hsun Huang, I’m the only one who sends them all a Christmas AND birthday card every single year for the last fourteen years – do you have any idea what that costs me in postage? And I get thank you notes back from…

Larry’s Bee - Part Two

Posted by Jon Peddie on August 7th 2008 | Permalink
Categories: The Market
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Last week I posed a postulate that Intel could justify the investment in Larrabee (Larry’s Bee) on the basis of obtaining some level of parity with the incumbents, mainly ATI and Nvidia. And in my rush to post and then catch an airplane, I included the total discrete graphics semiconductor market, not just the desktop discrete market – sigh. OK, I’ll eat a little humble pie, give you the right numbers but more importantly suggest something bigger. First the numbers I mistakenly used the total GPU (desktop and notebook) in my calculation of Intel’s TAM – although the charts revealed the…

Why not Larrabee?

Posted by Jon Peddie on August 1st 2008 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, The Market
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Anyone not stuck in outer space or maximum security knows Intel is going to introduce a new chip code named Larrabee. At Siggraph they are going to reveal, after almost two years of teases and leaks, the architecture of the device. It is not a GPU as many have mistakenly described it, but it can do most graphics functions, Intel says it can do all, we’ll have to wait for proof. Right now its slide-ware, but development systems are supposed to become available in November. ATI and Nvidia will be very busy discrediting the device and pointing out its shortcomings. They…

Paranoid protectionists Prima Donnas of the press plead for protection

Posted by Jon Peddie on July 9th 2008 | Permalink
Categories: The Market
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We recently sent out about a zillion invites to the press to invite them to our luncheon in LA during Siggraph. Aside from finding out who’s not working (out of the office till…) and who’s not employed (permanent failure party does not exist) we also learned that there’s a whole bunch of press people who just can’t cope with email, especially from strangers (given such an attitude, I would guess their friends list is small) These timid and violated poor souls seek refuse from the onslaught of email from strangers offering millions from Nigeria, sex forever, and new hair in places…

iPhone breaks Moore’s law

Posted by Jon Peddie on July 5th 2008 | Permalink
Categories: The Market
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My new phone cost more than my PC or TV I’m getting ready to buy the iPhone. I mean buy it, not lease it from AT&T. I’ve been saving my allowance, and taking bottles and cans to the recyclers, and I’m getting close to the $700 needed (plus taxes) for the 16 GB 3G iPhone, I can hardly wait. While I’m waiting I watch a little TV on my new 32-inch HD LCD TV that only cost $449 from Circuit City. And when I get bored with TV, I turn to my new $649 Dell Inspiron notebook with a 15- inch…

Attempted rapprochement

Posted by Jon Peddie on June 20th 2008 | Permalink
Categories: The Market
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Rumor has it there was an attempt at rapprochement. Long annoyed with The Inquirer’s loose cannon Charlie Demerjian, Nvidia has been shunning him and took him off the invitee list of most events. Water to a duck in the case of Charlie, he has so many sources the only reason he goes to any event is to score food and babes – he does better on the food as not many babes go to those things either. So Derek Perez, Nvidia’s boss of PR and infamous for having a knife fight with a former competitor and now employee Brian Burke, thought…

This is a rant about spin - Intel extends command in fast-computers tally

Posted by Jon Peddie on June 18th 2008 | Permalink
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The annual supercomputer conference was just held in Dresden Germany. At it they show off the top 500 supercomputers. Usually there are two or three new ones at the top and the rest shift downward till they fall off. Look at how the AP reported this event: Intel extends command in fast-computers tally Associated Press 06.18.08, 9:14 AM ET Microprocessors from Intel Corp. run more of the world's fastest computers than ever, according to a report released Wednesday that tracks progress in the computing industry. The latest list of the world's 500 most powerful computers, published twice a year by academic…

How many FLOPS?

Posted by Jon Peddie on May 24th 2008 | Permalink
Categories: Engineering and Development
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FLoating point Operations Per Second – FLOPS, one of the more obscure acronyms in our lives, and one of the oldest ones. It’s since been modified with a prefix of M (mega), G (giga) and most recently T (tera). A Terra is a million millions, one trillion (1012) a whole lot of anything, whether its cycles (Hertz), Bytes, dollars, or FLOPS. (And note - the ‘S’ in FLOPS is capitalized.) So I was asked recently, how many TFLOPS in all the game consoles? There are two answers to that question. Do you mean in all the ones built, or just the…

Moore’s law violated by inflation – your new laptop will cost more

Posted by Jon Peddie on May 22nd 2008 | Permalink
Categories: The Market
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Another contributor to sluggish PC sales for this year Even though one of the applied tenants of Moore’s law is that prices will drop over time (Moore never said that, it’s just a statement that has been applied to his original observation about feature size shrinkage over time), it appears the rising price of oil will change that as nations around the world grapple with inflation. Prices will rise. This appears to be showing up first in laptop costs as reports of higher priced magnesium-aluminum alloy chassis are coming out of China with cost increases of 10% due to rising metal…

Come together ... over me

Posted by Jon Peddie on May 20th 2008 | Permalink
Categories: IDTV
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Common people now, smile on your brother, everybody get together, try to love one another - for a while… We’re getting closer to the dream, the vision, of ubiquity mutual connectivity in the home – and maybe beyond a bit. My vision, since 1999, has been that everything in the home will talk to everything in the home. Everything that can will be a server, and everything will be a client. Since 1999 I’ve had to modify my vision a bit, I’ve had to learn a strange new alphabet, B, A, C, U, and then N – what’s that all about?…

Educating the next crop of engineers

Posted by Jon Peddie on April 7th 2008 | Permalink
Categories: Engineering and Development
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As I pondered this ponderous title and the challenge it represents for me to lead the round table at COFES it got me thinking about how we learn. Studies have shown that children learn fast and do so until they become 19 to 20 years old, then their brains become less flexible and learning takes longer, and it’s more difficult. By the time one reaches full adulthood and middle age  you really have to work at it to learn new things; languages are particularly difficult because of the contextual and grammatical differences, they don’t easily fit our well honed models and…

Special Glass

Posted by Jon Peddie on March 30th 2008 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, IDTV
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Actually this entry should be named Special Plastic, because we don’t really use glass in our displays anymore do we? But we do specialize because one size doesn’t fit all (needs.) I have eight screens that I use. I watch TV on my 32-inch LG LCD.TV. I watch movies with either my PS3 for HD, or my Xbox360 for regular DVDs, or on my eight-foot projector screen. I watch YouTube videos, do email and other office things on my 17-inch laptop I play games on my Skulltrail PC with a Dell 30-inch display. I read books on my six-inch E-ink Kindle.…

Is this a test?

Posted by Jon Peddie on February 28th 2008 | Permalink
Categories: Content Creation
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I once had a cat named Alice. She was great company when I was working late at night, or very early in the morning. I would talk to her and she would look at me attentively, and sometimes answer with a little meow. During WWII Alan Turing developed the Turing test, which was a challenge and the basis for AI that asked the observer to see if he or she could determine if the correspondent (on a remote computer) was a machine or a human. That was the foundation for the A.L.I.C.E foundation, and those AI developers developed Alice the bot.…

SLI on Skulltrail – how?

Posted by Jon Peddie on February 15th 2008 | Permalink
Categories: Blogs, Games
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That’s what I wanted to know – how’d you get SLI to work on the 5444 chipset. I asked the folks at Intel. I got shrugged shoulders and apologetic smiles. Not being coy, the people I was talking to just didn’t know, but did, in true (and almost always reliable) Intel fashion, promise to ask around and find out. I figured it was magic, a little trickery maybe, but if it was, it wasn’t easy. It's well known Intel doesn't have an SLI license, but the Nvidia SLI control panel on the computer was operational in the Display Settings dialog box,…

What’s Apple’s next trick? Jon thinks it’s gamey

Posted by Jon Peddie on February 7th 2008 | Permalink
Categories: Games
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Apple, which used to be known as Apple Computer, is today possibly one of the greatest consumer electronics companies in the universe. It's interesting and admirable how the Mac transitioned from the computer of choice for artists and photographers to a consumers delight, and didn't lose any of its artist photographer fans — in fact if anything, they are stronger and more convinced (vindicated?) than ever. Apple has created customer loyalty as great as Sony used to enjoy. It used to be Sony that was the one to bring out the marvelous new consumer products, and they charged more because they…

Ink — I love ink

Posted by Jon Peddie on January 23rd 2008 | Permalink
Categories: Engineering and Development
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Electronic ink or electronic paper (e-paper) was developed in the 1970s by Nick Sheridon at Xerox's Palo Alto Research Center and it was called Gyricon. Its technical name is electrophoretic display meaning a display that forms visible images by rearranging charged pigment particles (i.e., powder like substances) using an applied electric field. In the early 2000s the technology began to gain some traction and looked like it could be mass produced, albeit in small sizes. One of its first commercial applications was for the second display on mobile phones, and in 2001 E Ink and Philips Components announced plans to jointly…