Acer’s Chromebook

Posted by Jon Peddie on October 8th 2013 | Permalink
Categories: Hardware Review
Tags: hp acer google android chrome chromebook

Jon Peddie

The Acer Chromebook is a slick-looking, lightweight one-inch-thick clamshell device with an 11.6-inch 1366 × 768 screen (135 PPI) powered by an Intel Celeron processor. It runs the Google proprietary Chrome OS (this is not Android), and that creates a few problems. But this lightweight machine (3 pounds) is an easy-to-tote device with a full-sized keyboard. The device has three USB 2.0 ports, as well as a RJ45, a VGA port, and a HDMI port (courtesy the Celeron). Also, as part of the Intel chipset, there is built-in Wi-Fi that finds your network almost instantly. This is an always-connected, continually updated…

Razer gaming laptop

Posted by Robert Dow on October 8th 2013 | Permalink
Categories: Hardware Review
Tags: gpu nvidia laptop windows 8 razer blade

Robert Dow

The world’s thinnest gaming laptop: Razer Blade

Acer’s H6510BD projector and the search for S3D

Posted by Jon Peddie on July 18th 2013 | Permalink
Categories: Hardware Review
Tags: acer peddie projector h6510bd

You can have S3D with the right ID We have been testing the new Acer DLP-based H6510BD projector for a few weeks, and gave a preliminary report on it in TechWatch Volume 13, Number 11 May 21, 2013, p 27. As a general-purpose HD projector, you can’t beat this machine. Bright, lightweight, fast, and lots of inputs.   Just to review the general specifications: It has TI’s latest and greatest display panel, a 0.65" DarkChip 3 DMD (Digital Micromirror Device is what TI is calling their DLP these days). Its native resolution is 1080P (1920 x 1080, WUXGA), and can scale…

Acer’s HD 3D Projector

Posted by Robert Dow on July 15th 2013 | Permalink
Categories: Hardware Review
Tags: 3d acer projector h6510bd

Robert Dow

Lot of power, great value, small package Acer let us play with two of their newest projectors, the H5370BD and a H6510BD a native 1920 x 1080p resolution, 120 Hz projector, with 4:3/16:9/L.Box aspect ratios enabling 3D content projected via DLP Link Technology: Blu-Ray 3D and Nvidia 3DTV Play. The H9500 is a scaled down version of the H5370BD and has a native 720p resolution at 120 Hz. The H6510BD also has a built-in 2D to 3D converter.   The projector is bright and crisp, offering 10,000:1 contrast ratio and 3000 Lm brightness, and a F2.59 to 2.87 lens and a…

New Features in Lightroom 5 Beta

Posted by Kathleen Maher on July 15th 2013 | Permalink
Categories: Software Review
Tags: adobe lightroom cloud

Kathleen Maher

Just before the kick-off of Adobe Max, Adobe released its latest version of Lightroom, its photo management product, as the Lightroom V5 beta. Lightroom is designed for photographers and it is as much a basic editing tool as it is an organization tool. For many people for whom Photoshop might be overkill, Lightroom may have just enough editing for most work; it has crop, straighten, exposure, color, sharpness, and lens correction. The V5 version is not necessarily a significant release, but there are several features decidedly nice and two that make the release a must-have for users of Lightroom. So, not…

Qualcomm captures and displays 4K

Posted by Jon Peddie on June 4th 2013 | Permalink
Categories: Hardware Review
Tags: qualcomm snapdragon ultrahd hevc

Bring it, says the company

Crysis 3: Are its system requirements too high?

Posted by Harrison Garovi on March 28th 2013 | Permalink
Categories: Software Review
Tags: video games crysis 3

Harrison Garovi

To see more you have to have more; consoles are a practical alternative The Crysis series has always been known for its groundbreaking graphics and top notch physics engine. But when is enough, enough? PC gamers generally want the most powerful rig to purchase or build to their heart’s desire. Many newcomers might be discouraged when they learn how expensive all the necessary parts may be in order to play Crysis 3 at maximum settings. System requirements—such as the necessity of using a DirectX 11 graphics card—don’t play fair to loyal fans of the series, at least in economic terms. If…

Visio service and support

Posted by Jon Peddie on March 20th 2013 | Permalink
Categories:
Tags: nvidia graphics qualcomm mt. tiburon testing tegra htc one x+

Jon Peddie

We bought a 60-inch Visio smart TV in November to watch the election (we’ve since found other uses for it). It’s a beautiful looking device, with a thin bezel and an overall thickness of just 1.9 inches. And it is smart—it found our network and connected itself almost instantly. I won’t bore you with the spec, you can read them online. The only problem with the machine was it would randomly turn itself off, after 3 minutes, or 5, or 20, you’d never know when, or if, it was going to do it. In the process of trying to figure it…

The pen is mightier than the finger

Posted by Jon Peddie on February 13th 2013 | Permalink
Categories:
Tags: nvidia graphics qualcomm mt. tiburon testing tegra htc one x+

Jon Peddie

Re-visiting N-trig and the Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet Of all the tablets we’ve tested (and certainly not all that are in the market), one of my favorites is the Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet. One reason is because it has excellent pen input capability. Introduced in late 2011 with a 2.1 GHz Tegra processor and Android 4.0.3 (Ice Cream Sandwich), the device has proven rugged, reliable, and useful. However, the pen input has been challenging at times, and I thought it would be interesting to look into that a bit more. The catalyst for my enquiry was N-trig. They visited us a few months…

Lenovo C30 workstation with Nvidia’s Quadro K5000

Posted by Alex Herrera on February 13th 2013 | Permalink
Categories:
Tags: nvidia graphics qualcomm mt. tiburon testing tegra htc one x+

Alex Herrera

In our nearly two decades tracking the market and researching technology, we’ve reviewed plenty of workstations. Comparing and contrasting models from competing vendors hasn’t always been an easy or particularly revealing exercise, because the plain truth is the silicon guts of today’s workstation models from leaders HP, Dell, Lenovo, and Fujitsu are very much the same. Intel CPUs and chipsets ship in 100% of Tier 1 OEMs workstations, while Nvidia commands anywhere from 85% to 90% of GPUs (depending on the quarter). With all working off the same set of building blocks, OEMs have to work overtime engineering and marketing workstation…