Dynadock: The almost

Posted by Kathleen Maher on June 4th 2007 | Permalink
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Kathleen Maher

This week we’re testing a nifty little 2001 A Space Odyssey–looking monolithic device from Toshiba called Dynadock. The concept is amazingly clever: simply plug it into a USB 2.0 socket on your laptop (or desktop for that matter), and you’re done. Plugged into the Dynadock is your RJ45 CAT5 Ethernet cable, your DVI second monitor, your optical S/PDIF and/or 3-mm stereo jack, and whatever other (up to six) USB devices you use (e.g., keyboard, mouse, disks, etc.).

Graphics boards and chips

Posted by Kathleen Maher on May 21st 2007 | Permalink
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Kathleen Maher

In the last week of April AMD held a little party first in Tunisia and later in the week in Sunnyvale, because those AMD folks really like to party and stack up the mileage points. To attend either of these shindigs you had to sign a NDA promising you wouldn’t say or write anything about what you might hear at the event until May 14, 2007. On Tuesday April 24 we were given details about the R600 chip and the AIB it would grace, the Radeon HD2900. We were not given any boards (which is normally what is done) and were told they would be shipped to us in a few days.

Want to do more, then you need to see more – AMD’s R690

Posted by Jon Peddie on April 9th 2007 | Permalink
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Jon Peddie

It’s taken a while, but like “S.T.A.L.K.E.R.,” the R690 has been worth the wait. What’s that? That, son, is the wait for our evaluation of the AMD R690 Asus motherboard. And the reason it took this long, when the web guys had their reviews out almost the same day AMD announced it, was due to two things: (a) the chief geek was involved in an all-consuming trial and couldn’t get to it full time, and (b) we hit some roadblocks and discovered some stuff that’s interesting, plus our test was targeted at a different POV than the yadda-yadda benchmarks. We were interested in displays, lots and lots of displays, and we were interested in Vista.

First impressions of “S.T.A.L.K.E.R.: Shadow of Chernobyl”

Posted by Jon Peddie on April 9th 2007 | Permalink
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Jon Peddie

>The long-awaited game based on the nuclear accident at Chernobyl in 1986 and the subsequent movie of the same name are finally here.

AMD likes four

Posted by Kathleen Maher on February 26th 2007 | Permalink
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Kathleen Maher

couple of months ago we reviewed AMD’s 4x4, possibly the most powerful machine that one can still call a PC. Now AMD has brought out the RS690 chipset, and among its many features the one that caught my eye (no pun intended) is the ability to drive four displays—another four for AMD.

Getting back to the future

Posted by Jon Peddie on February 26th 2007 | Permalink
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Jon Peddie

As your official old-fart, been there-done-that curmudgeon, I’m happy to report that the PC has finally caught up with the Commodore PET (Personal Electronic Transactor) computer I used to write my thesis on back in 1980.

Mod this, dude

Posted by Jon Peddie on February 26th 2007 | Permalink
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Jon Peddie

In a recent Mt. Tiburon Testing Labs story (rFactor encore), Ted Pollak, our super-duper, super gamer analyst, goes nuts for a racing game mod (and it is pretty damn spectacular, if I do say so). I, however, went for a FPS.

rFactor encore

Posted by Ted Pollak on February 26th 2007 | Permalink
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Ted Pollak

Since downloading the top mods for the previously reviewed “rFactor” I find it necessary to continue. Fantastic is the only word that comes to mind.

Sandio’s Game O 3D mouse

Posted by Kathleen Maher on January 8th 2007 | Permalink
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Kathleen Maher

The Sandio Game O 3D gaming mouse is a well-designed device that incorporates three mini-joysticks for either six degrees of freedom in 3D applications, or whatever the user custom-programs them to do. Other features of the mouse include a removable palm rest base and two additional programmable buttons, which when pressed in unison cycle the mouse on the fly through four dpi settings ranging from 400 to 2000.

NEC omnibus display

Posted by Kathleen Maher on January 8th 2007 | Permalink
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Kathleen Maher

NEC invented the multisync monitor in 1985—22 years ago. The company was king of the hill for computer monitors for a long, long time, but slowly lost market share to aggressive Taiwanese monitor companies like LLLL and in 2000 merged with long-time rival Mitsu-bishi. NEC was also one of the first to bring out LCD monitors.