The latest processors from Intel and AMD

Posted by Robert Dow on January 21st 2015 | Discuss (0)
Categories: Hardware Review
Tags: nvidia amd aib intel processor fx i7 5960x corei7 fx 9590

Robert Dow

In late August 2014, Intel released its high-end Core i7-5960X Haswell-E 8-core 3.0-GHz CPU, which includes a new X99 chipset, the first consumer processor using DDR4 memory, a new CPU socket that is not backward-compatible, and no GPU. A few days later AMD released its high-end 8-core FX Black 9000 series CPUs with a 4-GHz clock, DDR3 controller, and no GPU. Both systems use water-cooling for the CPU.  Intel and AMD have new high-performance CPU products. Intel further strengthened its power in the market by introducing 14-nm products, while AMD uses a 28-nm process, and thus fell a step behind Intel.…

LG’s super-wide, highres IPS LED monitor

Posted by Jon Peddie on January 7th 2015 | Discuss (0)
Categories: Hardware Review
Tags: lg thunderbolt 34uc97 gaming monitor

Jon Peddie

Nearly three feet of desktop make this the ultimate gaming monitor A Christmas surprise arrived in the Mount Tiburon Testing Labs: a new wide high-res IPS LED monitor from LG. This monitor is going to be shown at CES, and it will very likely change the way people think about gaming monitors. So what’s so special about this monitor? Wide field of view—the more you can see, the more you can shoot  High-contrast IPS display  No-glare (not shiny) screen  Input for every high-speed high-bandwidth source available, including Thunderbolt Best price/PPI ratio    What is it?  The LG 34UC97 has a 34.1-inch…

You too can live in a 3D world

Posted by Jon Peddie on December 29th 2014 | Discuss (0)
Categories: Hardware Review
Tags: vr virtual reality

Jon Peddie

At Siggraph 2014 in Vancouver,  Google was giving  away Cardboard VR glasses  that use your large-screen  smartphone as the display. I  didn’t learn about it soon enough and  didn’t get one. Every week since then  I’ve put away 5 cents, and when I collected  $4.55, I went on eBay and bought  a kit. I was motivated to buy the Cardboard  kit after reading Ben Delaney’s  new book, Sex, Drugs, and Tessellation.    The first step was to assemble the  cardboard box, and it was easy. Next  you go to Play Store, type in “cardboard,”  and download some apps. If  you only do…

DEFINING HI RES

Posted by Jon Peddie on December 29th 2014 | Discuss (0)
Categories: Hardware Review
Tags:

Jon Peddie

A word about representing screen resolution You can’t just draw bigger boxes

Half-Life 2 on Shield tablet

Posted by Jon Peddie on November 25th 2014 | Permalink
Categories: Hardware Review
Tags: nvidia gaming mobile tegra shield half-life 2

Jon Peddie

Playing an action-packed FPS on an 8-inch screen—amazing experience and memories Ten years old and still fantastic, one of the best games ever has been ported to An¬droid and Nvidia’s Tegra-based Shield tablet. The game is a whopping 2 GB and takes about an hour or more to download. When it’s finally loaded, you use the Shield wireless controller to play the game on the Shield’s 8-inch 1920 x 1200 screen, which is better than an HD experience. If you’ve played the game on a console, you won’t have any difficulty adapting to the Shield-tablet controller combo. If you’re a dyed-in-the-wool…

Is that a console in your pocket? - The Shield reveals new talents

Posted by Ted Pollak on November 25th 2014 | Permalink
Categories: Hardware Review
Tags: nvidia gaming mobile android console shield

Ted Pollak

IT ARRIVED AT JPR as just another tablet, but as staffers idly walk by and pick it up to play, we’re finding the Shield is more than a gaming tablet and more than a console replacement. When you combine the convenience of a tablet with the huge developer base of the Android, and HDMI, you get something that’s fun and functional.—Ed. As a matter of fact, that is a console in my pocket, my back pocket, and I am also happy to see you because I have good news. Hardcore PC gamers finally have their best option for HDTV gaming. Why?…

Benchmarking the Quadro K5200 and K2200

Posted by Alex Herrera on November 19th 2014 | Permalink
Categories: Hardware Review
Tags: nvidia quadro spec k2200 k5200

Alex Herrera

Nvidia kindly offered us two of the new Quadro cards to test performance, the high end Quadro K5200 and the mid-range K2200. Our benchmarking tool of choice was the same we've used extensively in the past: Viewperf 12. This latest version of SPEC's venerable Viewperf benchmark is designed to isolate the stress on the graphics card specifically, rather than the system as a whole. As a result, its scores reflect the GPU installed and do not (at least should not) reflect differences in other key system components like CPU, memory and storage. It streams pre-defined viewsets (OpenGL and DirectX), representing typical,…

Alienware Graphics Amplifier

Posted by Ted Pollack on November 14th 2014 | Permalink
Categories: Hardware Review
Tags: dell graphics amplifier alienware

Gaming on a notebook has traditionally been a less than ideal solution for most committed PC gamers. Thin and light laptops with integrated (or lower end dGPU) graphics can only handle a limited range of current generation games. Nevertheless, serious gaming notebooks can handle just about any gaming task quite well. However they are heavy, expensive and you cannot upgrade them. There are transient gamers who don’t want to haul a desktop or have the space for it, but they do play in a desktop ergonomic with their notebooks, sometimes using an external display. Alienware has come to the rescue. Recently…

Nvidia’s GTX 980 Maxwell monster

Posted by Robert Dow on October 9th 2014 | Permalink
Categories: Hardware Review
Tags: nvidia amd r9 titan z gtx 980

Robert Dow

If you’re a gaming enthusiast, this is the AIB you’ve been waiting for

Benchmarking the AMD FirePro W9100

Posted by Alex Herrera on April 16th 2014 | Permalink
Categories: Hardware Review
Tags: nvidia amd w9100 workstations viewperf w9000

Our choice to benchmark the FirePro W9100 is the same tool we used previously on its W9000 predecessor: Viewperf 12. This latest version of SPEC’s venerable Viewperf benchmark is designed to isolate the stress on the graphics card specifically, rather than the system as a whole. As a result, scores reflect the GPU installed and do not (at least should not) reflect differences in other key system components like CPU, memory, and storage. It streams pre-defined viewsets (OpenGL and DirectX), representing typical, visual demands of popular workstation-caliber applications, including PTC Creo, Dassault Systemés CATIA and Solidworks, Siemens NX, and Autodesk Maya…